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project // kanzashi butterfly headband

Kanzashi Butterfly


I really like making headbands, especially when I can customize them for holidays and even outfits that I have planned. The headband I'm sharing today fits both of those special uses. But let's back up just a little.

The butterfly theme that keeps showing up in my projects and posts (yes, there are plenty more fluttery friends coming!) was chosen because butterflies are so perfect for Easter time. They go through a kind of death that leads to new life. Forget the eggs, bunnies, candies and whatnot (although I do love those things!). Easter is about death and resurrection and life. For that, I'm forever grateful.

To keep a reminder of that on my mind, I thought I'd keep the butterfly on my head. The end result definitely looks more like something a child would wear, but since I volunteer with the kids at my church, I think it will be perfect to wear on Easter Sunday!

Kanzashi Butterfly

Here's what you need:

Fabric (I'm using 5 Happy Go Lucky charm squares)
Felt
Headband (the cheap kind from the $1 store cause less headband headache!)
Scissors
Needle and thread
Fabric glue

Kanzashi Butterfly Template PDF

Kanzashi Butterfly

By the way, this is called a Kanzashi Butterfly because it uses the Japanese technique of kanzashi. Sort of. I'm basically experimenting with this idea and going with what I like and not being formal about it. Mmmkay?

For a layered butterfly like mine, cut out 2 large hexagons, 2 medium hexagons, and 2 small hexagons.

If you don't want the small, extra wing pieces on top, omit the small hexagons. Or, if you want to make a smaller butterfly without the extra wing pieces, omit the large hexagons.

Kanzashi Butterfly

Take one of your largest hexagon pieces and fold it in half as shown.

Kanzashi Butterfly
Kanzashi Butterfly

Fold the point at one end of the fold down to the next point on the hexagon, but do this so it creates a valley.

Kanzashi Butterfly

Repeat this fold on the other side and you should end up with a little shape like this.

Kanzashi Butterfly

Using your needle and thread, stitch with loose running stitch along the three raw edges of the folded shape.

Kanzashi Butterfly

Pull the thread to gather it tight, then secure it with a knot (but don't clip the thread off!).

Kanzashi Butterfly

Repeat the folding and stitching process with the medium hexagon. You'll use the same thread that's attached to your first wing piece.

Kanzashi Butterfly
Kanzashi Butterfly

Tighten the gathering on the wing and tie it off. Now, make another set of wing pieces just like the first.

Kanzashi Butterfly

For the extra wing layer, take the smallest hexagon piece and fold it as with the other hexagons, but this time, bring the fold point down only half way between the hexagon points.

Kanzashi Butterfly

Stitch the raw edges with really big stitches, then pull to gather and tie it off. Repeat for the second piece.

Kanzashi Butterfly

Join the two-part wings together with a few stitches at the top and bottom, then tack the extra wing layer on top. You could do this with the fabric glue, but I like the security of stitching.

Kanzashi Butterfly

Cut two felt ovals and one felt strip.

Kanzashi Butterfly

Place a little glue at each end of one of the ovals, but leave the middle free of glue. This will be important because your headband will eventually need to slide through here. Press the second oval on top of the first.

Kanzashi Butterfly
Kanzashi Butterfly

Glue the butterfly down onto the felt oval base. This time, you'll want the glue in the middle, but not on the ends.

And let's just pause to relish in the amazement that is Fabri-Tac. I never thought I'd be a fabric glue kinda gal, but I totally am for projects like this!

Kanzashi Butterfly

Check that the felt strip is the right length for covering your butterfly body. If you eliminated the extra pieces or used only the medium and small pieces, you may need to shorten this piece.

Add some glue to each end of the felt strip.

Kanzashi Butterfly

Stick the ends of the felt piece down onto the oval base, covering the raw edges of the wings.

Kanzashi Butterfly

After everything has dried, slide the headband through the oval base. It's all ready to wear!

Of course, you can very easily change this into a pin instead of a headband. Just attach a pinback to one of the oval pieces before you glue it together!

Kanzashi Butterfly

I'm so excited to have this to wear on Sunday! It matches the skirt that I'll be wearing, and I'm sure that the preschoolers that I work with will love it too.

May you have a very blessed Easter, celebrating the risen Savior!

guest posting my dear stella dress me patterns

Dress Me Stitching

Hey Friends! Today I'm blogging over at the Dear Stella blog, where you'll find the free clothing patterns I created to go with their Wee Gallery Dress Me fabric! If you've been following along this week, you know how much I enjoyed the opportunity to work with them and their super soft and lovely fabric. I'll see you over there!

project // dress me embroidered pillow

Dress Me! Pillow


Once I got my hands on the new Dress Me fabric from Dear Stella, I couldn't stop at just one project. In fact, even though I've only made two projects with this print, I have several more I'd like to try in time, because there are just so many possibilities. Nicole found a great way to use it in a big way!

When you look at a big piece of this fabric, you'll see that it kind of runs in columns of animals. Taking my cue from that, I created this pillow that has a strip of stitched sweeties that really pop with the black that surrounds them. To make your own, here's what you need:

Dear Stella Dress Me fabric
Black fabric
Embroidery floss
Cotton batting
12-inch pillow form
Scissors
Needle
Rotary cutter and mat
Pins
Sewing machine

The clothing patterns I used for my embroidered panel are free for you on the Dear Stella blog!

Dress Me! Pillow

Start by choosing three of the animals in a column that you want on your pillow. Embroider some clothes on them.

Dress Me! Pillow

Cut the embroidered area into a strip that is 4 inches wide by 15 inches tall. Cut a piece of black fabric that is also 4 x 15 inches, and another black piece that is 8 x 15 inches.

Dress Me! Pillow
Dress Me! Pillow

Pin and sew these three strips together so that the embroidery is in the middle. I used 3/8-inch seams.

Do pay attention to which direction your animals seem to be facing. The kitty is looking to the left, so I positioned the embroidered strip on the right. However, if the animals you choose are looking the other way, you may want to shift the center panel to the left side.

Dress Me! Pillow

Cut a 15-inch square of batting and black fabric and make a quilt sandwich so that the batting is between the fabric layers. Pin the layers together.

Dress Me! Pillow
Dress Me! Pillow

Use a white pencil to mark vertical lines for quilting. You'll want lines right on either side of the stitched panel, then more that are evenly spaced on the black areas. Mine are 2 inches apart, but you can change this to suit your taste and patience!

With black embroidery thread or perle cotton, quilt the lines with running stitch. Or, if you'd rather, machine quilt the black areas.

When all of the quilting is finished, square up the pillow front and trim it down to 14 inches square. You could start with it this size, but sometimes the quilting alters the size, and it's better to trim it than wish you had more wiggle room!

Dress Me! Pillow

Cut two pieces of black fabric that are 14 x 10 inches. On each, fold and press one long edge down by 1/2 inch, then fold and press it again. Sew this folded hem. These two pieces will form the envelope back for your pillow cover.

Dress Me! Pillow

Lay your pillow front face up, then place one of the back pieces on top so the raw edges match up with the top and sides of the pillow front, and so that the "right" side of the hem is face down. Place the second back piece on top of this so that the hemmed edge overlaps with the first back piece. Pin around the edges.

Dress Me! Pillow

Sew around all four sides. I like to back stitch on areas where the back pieces are hemmed because these will have the most stress when inserting the pillow form. You don't want anything ripping!

Dress Me! Pillow

Carefully trim the corners, then turn the cover right side out. Slide your pillow form in, and get it all smoothly situated inside.

Dress Me! Pillow

This pillow makes me so happy! Especially that piggy. My sister has always had a fondness for pigs, and when you see one that's throwing confetti in the air, you can't help but smile. Of course, they're all adorable animals!

Dress Me! Pillow
Dress Me! Pillow
Dress Me! Pillow

Be sure to check out the entire Wild fabric line by Wee Gallery for Dear Stella, and if you make anything from the fabrics, share it and tag your photos with #dearstella so we can see!

Dress Me! Pillow

Special thanks to Dear Stella for the fun fabric I've been stitching with!

project // ruffled stitching pouch

Ruffled Stitching Pouch


A couple months ago (has it really been that long?) I shared how to make a super simple stitching pouch to hold your embroidery work. It's the kind of thing that you probably want more than one of, because, let's face it...we all have a bunch of things that we're working on at any given time.

This time around I've made a pouch that has a little ruffle that not only looks cute, but also serves as an extra means of keeping everything safe and sound inside. Oh, and I made it from the CUTEST fabric from Wee Gallery for Dear Stella and added some embroidery embellishment!

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

The outside fabric is called Alphabet and the lining and ruffle are Hearts in blue, from the same line. The Hearts print reminds me of my childhood and makes me so happy!

To make your own ruffled stitching pouch, here's what you need:

2 Fabrics - 1/4 yard each (fat quarters work!)
Fusible interfacing - 19 x 9.5 inches
Embroidery floss
Needle and thread
Scissors
Iron
Sewing Machine
Pins
Rotary cutter and mat (optional)

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

From each of the two fabrics, cut a piece that is 19 x 9.5 inches. From the fabric you're using for the ruffle, cut a piece that is 12 x 2.5. If your fabrics go one way, be sure to pay attention to the direction.

On my fabric, I added some stitching to some of the alphabet letters as well as to a few details. If you're doing this too, keep the stitching in from the edges a bit.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Iron the fusible interfacing onto the back of the fabric for the outside of the pouch.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch
Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Fold the ruffle strip in half lengthwise, with right sides together. Sew the two ends together with an 1/8-inch seam allowance. Now, turn the ruffle right side out and press the fold.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch
Ruffled Stitching Pouch

With the needle and thread, stitch a line of running stitch close to the raw edge of the ruffle. Pull the stitches to gather the ruffle until it is just under 8 inches wide. Secure the thread with a good knot so it stays in place.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Pin the ruffle onto the center of one of the short ends of the outside piece of fabric. Space the gathers as evenly as you can.

Keep in mind that the end of the fabric you use will be the top of the opening for the pouch. Also, the side of the ruffle that is facing down will be the side that shows, so again, if the fabric is directional, this is important to watch for!

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Machine baste the ruffle to the outside fabric piece using a 1/8-inch seam allowance.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Pin the lining fabric on top of the outside piece, right sides together. Fold the edges of the ruffles in so they don't get caught in the seams.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Starting at the short end that is opposite from the ruffle, sew around the pouch, leaving an opening for turning.

I used a 1/4-inch seam allowance, but then I trimmed the seams down to 1/8-inch and clipped the corners to help reduce bulk. The opening for turning, however, is still 1/4-inch.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Turn the pouch right side out and poke the corners out with a chopstick or similar object. Fold in the edges of the opening and pin the seam closed as shown.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Top stitch the two short ends with a 1/8-inch seam allowance. It looks nice and finished...and it closes the opening!

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Fold the ruffled end down by about 1-1/2 inches (this isn't to exact!), and fold the bottom end up to meet the edge where the ruffle is coming out. Pin the sides and sew them together with a 1/4-inch seam allowance.

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Now your stitching pouch is ready to be put to use!

The only thing I would have changed on mine is the fabric direction. The Alphabet print does have these super sweet items in all directions, but it tends to go more one way than the others. In my head, I thought it would be best if the large area of the bag (the back) had things mainly upright. Now that it's finished, I wonder if I should have switched that around. Ah well...I love it no matter which way I turn it!

Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Because the ruffle is not as wide as the pouch, it allows you to very easily slide your work inside, then it pops right back out to cover the opening!

Ruffled Stitching Pouch
Ruffled Stitching Pouch

All of the little details in this fabric have me in love! I'm pretty sure there will be more embroidery projects with this Wee Gallery print in my future!

Ruffled Stitching Pouch
Ruffled Stitching Pouch
Ruffled Stitching Pouch

Happy Stitching! And thanks to Dear Stella for providing such joy-filled fabric!