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flashback // ghosts of halloween projects past

Ghostie Garland

I thought I'd take a quick look back at a few Halloween projects that I've shared here. Maybe you've seen them before, or maybe not! They're not-so-scary to get done before Halloween...I promise!

Click the name of the project to see the full post. Oh, and the "Pin It" button will allow you to pin the original post so that you can find the full tutorials when you're ready to start crafting!

Spooky Spider Friends // Wild Olive

Spooky Cat Coasters

Pumpkin Book Band

Flying Ghost Toy

Half-Hexi Spider Web

pumpkin notepad

Halloween Patterns From Dad

project // the great pumpkin stockings

Pumpking "Stocking"


"The pumpkins were hung by the chimney with care, in hopes that the Great Pumpkin soon would be there."

That's how that poem goes, right?

For those of you who are new to Wild Olive, let me start this by introducing my family. I'm the oldest of six kids and my youngest sister is 9 years old. We love holidays and generally enjoy a bit of silliness.

In the last few years, we've started talking more about the Great Pumpkin (you know, as in, It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown). We've left notes out in yard near where the pumpkins were growing, and other such things. My little brothers and sister know that it's all in jest, and they love it!

So this year, my little sis said that I should make some pumpkin "stockings" so we could hang them on the mantle. It was just too fun to pass up! Read on for the pattern and DIY, as well as some fun ways to use this, even if you aren't inviting the Great Pumpkin to your house.

Pumpking "Stocking"

You will need:
(makes one)

1/4 yard orange fabric (or two pieces if you would like contrasting lining)
1/4 yard mid-weight fusible interfacing
15-inch piece of ribbon
2 buttons (I used leaves, but plain ones will do!)
embroidery floss
black felt

iron
scissors
pins
sewing machine
needle and thread
fabric glue

Pumpkin Stocking PDF Pattern

A note on fabric: I was making six of these, so I bought six cuts, then staggered the fabrics for the linings, so I got contrast without waste. Also, if your fabric store doesn't always give you straight, full cuts, you may want to be safe and get 1/3 yard, as you will need a full 1/4 for this.

Pumpking "Stocking"

Iron the fusible interfacing onto the back of your outside fabric. The width of the interfacing will be just enough for the shapes to be cut.

Pumpking "Stocking"

Using the templates and adding a 1/4-inch seam allowance, cut two outside pieces and two lining pieces.

Pumpking "Stocking"

Pin an outside piece to a lining piece with right sides together. Sew across the top edge. Repeat for the other pieces.

Pumpking "Stocking"

Now, place the sewn pieces right sides together, so that the lining matches the lining and the outside matches the outside. Sew around the shape, leaving an opening in the lining section. You can see where I pinned the opposite direction to make sure I didn't sew it closed. Also, you'll want to back stitch at the start and stop, since you'll be turning this right side out.

Pumpking "Stocking"

Clip the curves, and carefully snip the indent. Just don't cut through any stitches!

Pumpking "Stocking"
Pumpking "Stocking"

Turn the pumpkin right side out and smooth the curves. You'll notice that on the sides where the shapes meet, it's a little puckered. Don't worry, that will go away soon.

Stitch the opening in the lining closed. I used ladder stitch, but whip stitch works too.

Pumpking "Stocking"

Push the lining into the pouch and again, smooth everything out. Give it a nice ironing too, because it will be wrinkly from turning it.

Pumpking "Stocking"

Trim the ends of your ribbon piece and sew it on at the two edges of the opening. You can stitch through all of the layers, the ribbon, and the buttons at one time using three strands of orange embroidery floss.

Pumpking "Stocking"

Cut out the face pieces from black felt and use fabric glue to attach them.

You could stitch these on before you start sewing the bag together, but remember...I had six to make. Glue sped things up, and it looks nice and neat!

Pumpking "Stocking"
Pumpking "Stocking"

Hey! Your pumpkin stocking is finished! Now, I realize that your family may not be quite as quirky as we are, so instead of hanging these by your fireplace, consider these options:

Halloween purse for your little girl
Trick-or-treat pouch for your little one in a stroller
Super special gift bag

Pumpking "Stocking"
Pumpking "Stocking"

But come on. You've gotta admit that a row of pumpkins on your mantle would be pretty sweet, right?

I've heard that the Great Pumpkin will be filling these with each person's favorite candy treat (because you never seem to get enough of your favorite while trick-or-treating). However, they would be perfect as a way to give kids healthy treats, let kids with food allergies have some special treats, or even some fun little non-sweet treats!

Pumpking "Stocking"

I'm hoping for Almond Joys in my pumpkin...what would you be wishing for from the Great Pumpkin?

my new old fabric stash

Fabric

Today I was going to share a tutorial post, but got a little distracted. My mom was clearing some things out and handed me a box. A box full of old fabric. Suddenly I found myself looking through each piece and there were only a few fabrics that I even considered parting with. They're probably mainly from the 80s and 90s, with lots of Christmas prints, but they have potential.

Now as if it wasn't bad enough to lose a day being distracted by looking through the box, I can foresee the next few months melting away as I make plans to put them all to use!

Back to our regularly scheduled posting tomorrow!

lovely spooky friends crafts


This month is about a cute little werewolf going trick-or-treating, but it's also about other spooky friends. The Wolf Man pictured is by Holly from Cotton Pickin' Fun, and she also has patterns for a darling mummy and plenty of other cute Halloween items and more.

I've added some to my Lovely Spooky Friends Crafts Pinterest board, where you'll find lots of fun projects to make for the 31st (or really, any time if you just like these characters!). Hop over and follow for more pins along the way!

project // EPP halloween-ish triangle mug rug

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug


I love the geometry of quilts, and I love how English paper piecing can make it easy to fit these shapes together and have everything match up. The technique is also perfect for small projects, which I adore.

Recently I spotted a simple, but striking quilt made up of equilateral triangles and fell head over heels. It was machine-pieced, but I figured I could do something similar with EPP. So I cut out some triangles, grabbed some fabric in Halloween-ish colors, and here we go!

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug

Here's what you need:

Four colored fabrics, 1/4 yard each
White or cream fabric, 1/4 yard
Cotton batting, 8x10 inches
Needle and thread
Embroidery floss
Scissors
Glue stick
Iron
Rotary cutter/ruler/mat (optional, but helpful!)
Pins


Equilateral Triangles EPP Templates

Note: the downloadable PDF has one page that shows my color layout and one page of the templates in black and white. You'll only need to print one copy of the templates on card stock.

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug

Cut out the template pieces and attach them to the fabric, following the layout as a guide for how many of each color you'll need. If you look at mine, you'll see that the corners are cut off blunt. You don't need to do that, but it makes for smaller flaps later on. I glue stick the templates onto the fabric in strips, and these corners happen naturally as I cut.

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug
Halloween Triangle Mug Rug

Baste the edges down as you normally do with EPP. Acute angles always feel looser to me when basting, but as long as you wrap them nicely, they'll be okay.

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug

Let's get these joined! Stitch the triangles together in a strip working to keep the corners matching. If you work in the right direction you can stitch continuously along in a zig zag. And if you find that you started at the wrong end and can't continue the zig zag, don't worry...I messed up the path several times as I worked!

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug
Halloween Triangle Mug Rug

After you've made the strips, join those together. Again, try to keep those points matching. I took a stitch through the points to help hold and align.

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug
Halloween Triangle Mug Rug

After all of the pieces come together, the back looks a little messy, but with a bit of ironing, it will smooth out. Where the points meet, you should have six flaps that will nest and lie flat in a sort of swirl.

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug

Now it's time to remove the papers. Because these are small triangles (and maybe I used too much glue?), I found them trickier to remove. A few ripped, but no worries!

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug

This next part feels dreadful. Cut the sides with the pointed edges so they are straight, and cut the batting to match. I used a rotary cutter and did them both at the same time. Cut a piece for the backing. It needs to be one inch larger on all sides, as this will also be the binding.

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug
Halloween Triangle Mug Rug

Pin the layers together and hand quilt however you'd like. I used three strands of embroidery floss and stitched points that echo the design of the inspiration quilt.

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug
Halloween Triangle Mug Rug

Fold and press the two long edges in toward the raw edges, then fold them over again.

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug

Stitch the folded binding edges down with running stitch. I used clips to hold mine down as I worked.

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug
Halloween Triangle Mug Rug

After the two long edges are done, do the two ends. Fold the corners over, then fold and press the sides as you did with the long edges. Try to get those corners to meet and look "mitered". Stitch the binding with running stitch.

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug
Halloween Triangle Mug Rug

Your mug rug is finished! I've heard people talk about how they don't understand mug rugs, but I like to think of them as functional mini quilts. Rarely do I but anything other than a mug on mine, so it's basically an oversized coaster. But you can make so many beautiful designs in this size that you couldn't on anything smaller. And yet, it's not overwhelming!

I will warn you, this took me longer than I expected to make. You may be able to complete it in a weekend, but I'd plan for more like a week or two of Netflix evenings!

Halloween Triangle Mug Rug


I chose colors that reflect the season but can be used all year, because I've got a lot of coffee and tea days ahead! I hope you'll join me!